Quote 2 Sep 6 notes
Today, there exists only one form of revolutionary solidarity: to win. It therefore demands of us that we should not neglect any single element that might put us in a condition to win.
— Antonio Gramsci, “Real Dialectics” (via bildochdialektik)
Photo 2 Sep 269 notes historicaltimes:

Mao Zedong playing ping pong, 1963.

historicaltimes:

Mao Zedong playing ping pong, 1963.

Link 2 Sep 3 notes Rotherham child sex abuse: it is our duty to ask difficult questions»

Really challenging article by Zizek. Worth thinking about the British Left’s utter reluctance to talk about Islamism for fear of generating Islamophobia. My feeling is that is this reluctance which cedes this ground to the right and this intensifies Islamophobia.

The conflict about multiculturalism already is a conflict about Leitkultur: it is not a conflict between cultures, but a conflict between different visions of how different cultures can and should co-exist, about the rules and practices these cultures have to share if they are to co-exist. One should thus avoid getting caught into the liberal game of “how much tolerance can we afford of the other”. At this level, of course, we are never tolerant enough, or we are already too tolerant. The only way to break out of this deadlock is to propose and fight for a positive universal project shared by all participants.

This is why a crucial task of those fighting for emancipation today is to move beyond mere respect for others towards a positive emancipatory Leitkultur that alone can sustain an authentic coexistence and immixing of different cultures.

p.s. haters you know where I’m at….

Text 31 Aug 3 notes Sunday Papers #4

image

Julien Adolphe Duvocelle

1) AM Corley’s rather philosophical two part (and 2) article on fairness and football was a wonderful read.

Even more: football at its most beautiful is a game about space, about where it will be and who can get there first, who can imagine its existence with a pass or touch, or remove it with a prophylactic run. Vlaar and Mascherano abhor open space and have made whole careers of ending it; Messi and Robben and Muller are inventive Euclids seeking it. A ball moves, and then a player, and a new geometry appears.

and on fairness

But maybe that unfairness is its genius. Texts do something for their readers, and if the comic sports are fairy tales, chances to believe briefly in a better world, then football is a chance to safely approach the sometimes-tender actuality of injustice. It’s far easier, for most people, to deal with their team losing on penalty kicks than it is to deal with losing a job, a partner, or a friend. Football just doesn’t matter quite as much. But the structures are the same—those deep offended griefs, that Milton’s-Satan sense of should-have-been—and so maybe football, more than other sports, instructs its viewers in the virtues recessionary life requires: how to continue in the face of awful things. How to hope and live and work for change despite them.

2) A small interview Vice did with Werner Herzog. Mainly just for this quote:

So I stopped him, and I said, “Tell me about an encounter with a squirrel,” and that’s where he came apart. That’s where he unravelled and we got to see very, very deep inside his soul.”

3) A decent article on the flaws with many interpretations of anti-imperialism came across my radar. Written by Tendance Coatesy, it’s a decent anti-national blog which I think is worth following. 

How does this affect  internationalism – something  basic behind genuine open-minded  ‘anti-imperialism’? Globalisation and mass migration have created a sense that the “distance” between lands is far less than it was 100 years ago.This is a fight that could unite people across the world against the ‘empire’ of those enlarging their grossly unequal territories, not divide them.  On this democratic and socialist basis we could be said to be “anti-imperialist”. But there is nothing, absolutely nothing, that corresponds today to the Comintern’s Fourth Congress, “anti-imperialist united front”, nor, given the diversity of  world politics and states, does one look likely to reappear.  There is no division of the world into clear-cut “camps” to choose. We have to make our own choices

4) Finally, interesting article about experimental exo-skeletons being used in ship building in Korea. The security and military implications of this stuff are pretty worrying.

Photo 31 Aug 841 notes aesza:

Brueghel, Jan t.e. - The Triumph of Death-detail#2 by ros_with_a_prince on Flickr.
Brueghel, Jan t.e. - The Triumph of Death-detail#2

aesza:

Brueghel, Jan t.e. - The Triumph of Death-detail#2 by ros_with_a_prince on Flickr.

Brueghel, Jan t.e. - The Triumph of Death-detail#2

via .
Photo 28 Aug 476 notes

(Source: ffffixas)

via .
Photo 26 Aug 23,708 notes

(Source: steepledfingers23)

via after-art.
Photo 26 Aug 227 notes historicaltimes:

A woman who is amongst the revolutionary forces occupying Tehran University, holds up her hand a day after the victory of the Islamic Revolution in Iran, Tehran, 12th February 1979 -
Read More

Challenging picture

historicaltimes:

A woman who is amongst the revolutionary forces occupying Tehran University, holds up her hand a day after the victory of the Islamic Revolution in Iran, Tehran, 12th February 1979 -

Read More

Challenging picture

Photo 26 Aug 512 notes

(Source: pasha-hasid)

Photo 26 Aug Last night I watched Ben Wheatley’s 2011 movie Kill List. Starts as a grimey kitchen sink hitman movie and becomes something much, much darker. Wheatley has done some other great movies including A Field in England as well as some of the Innonecent Smoothies adds (oddly at the same time as he was filming this total mind-fuck).

Don’t watch it alone!

Last night I watched Ben Wheatley’s 2011 movie Kill List. Starts as a grimey kitchen sink hitman movie and becomes something much, much darker. Wheatley has done some other great movies including A Field in England as well as some of the Innonecent Smoothies adds (oddly at the same time as he was filming this total mind-fuck).

Don’t watch it alone!


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